Blog Posts on Life of Worship

We Are Made for Praise

Jason DeRouchie
We Are Made for Praise

At that time I will bring you in, at the time when I gather you together; for I will make you renowned and praised among all the peoples of the earth, when I restore your fortunes before your eyes, says the Lᴏʀᴅ. (Zephaniah 3:20)

Zephaniah was one of Yahweh’s prophets of judgment, who foretold the day of the Lᴏʀᴅ — both the near day of judgment against Judah (Zephaniah 1:4–13; 2:2; 3:7) and the future day of judgment against the entire world (Zephaniah 1:1–3, 14–18; 3:8).

Such... Continue Reading

Praise: The Consummation of Joy

Sam Storms
Praise: The Consummation of Joy

My understanding of the nature of worship was radically transformed by a fundamental truth I found in C.S. Lewis, who died 50 years ago this month.

What Lewis helped me grasp is best explained by looking briefly at his own struggle with worship as he explained it in the essay titled, “A Word About Praising,” in his short book, Reflections on the Psalms, pages 90–98 in my worn, 1958 edition.

In a word, Lewis enabled me to recognize that not only was it permissible to enjoy God... Continue Reading

Five Facts About Loving God

Jason DeRouchie
Five Facts About Loving God

What is the relationship between loving God and neighbor, and how can both Jesus and Paul say that loving our neighbor fulfills the law (Matthew 7:12; Romans 13:8; Galatians 5:14)? Isn’t love for God an even higher priority?

Moses helps us answer these questions in Deuteronomy 10:16–19, where he portrays a radical love of neighbor as the key test to measure whether we are loving God with all.

With an echo of the call to love God with all, Moses opens Deuteronomy 10 by calling... Continue Reading

The Best Way to Start Your Everyday

Jonathan Parnell
The Best Way to Start Your Everyday

Psalm 143:8 may capture it best:

Let me hear in the morning of your steadfast love,
for in you I trust.
Make me know the way I should go,
for to you I lift up my soul.

Two things make up everyone’s everyday: receptivity and productivity. We are creatures who constantly take in and put out. We absorb and we exude.

The question is what will it be?

The psalmist tells us the best way to start.

The Battle Is On

David writes as a man in turmoil. The enemy has pursued his soul (Psalm... Continue Reading

Does Success Start on Sunday?

Jonathan Parnell
Does Success Start on Sunday?

In the outskirts of the city, on a road that’s walked as much as driven, a typical car brakes at a red light.

It is the kind of car so typical that the actual model stays blurry in memory. It is the kind of braking so natural that the driver must know this block. Everything in the scene fits: the worn road, the red light, the common car, but not the bumper sticker. That is a different story, with its weathered corners and sunbaked background accenting a phrase in all-caps Comic... Continue Reading

Dieting, Botox, and Honoring Jesus with Your Body

David Mathis
Dieting, Botox, and Honoring Jesus with Your Body

Undistracting attractiveness is John Piper’s term for it.

It’s a vision for the Christian to steer a middle course between idolizing our bodies and neglecting them. It includes giving our bodies enough attention — with sleep, diet, exercise, and upkeep — to avoid being distractingly unattractive, and reining in our impulses to pursue a self-focused attractiveness that distracts.

Deeper Than Dieting, Botox, and Plastic Surgery

Your body is a precious gift from... Continue Reading

Pizza! Pizza! Waking Up in Little Caesar’s

Jonathan Parnell
Pizza! Pizza! Waking Up in Little Caesar’s

This is a story of discovery. C.S. Lewis was my guide. It all happened because of one late afternoon in the Spring of Minnesota when I heard these words:

Now this is a story all about how my life got flipped, turned upside down. And I’d like to take a minute, just sit right there, I’ll tell you how I became the prince of a town called Bel-Air.

The Unusual Study

The story actually starts in the morning of that Spring day when I packed up my books and drove to a quaint... Continue Reading

The Strange Glory of Ordinary Things

John Piper
The Strange Glory of Ordinary Things

Clyde Kilby was born September 26, 1902. He may have been my most influential teacher when I was in college. But then again it may have been Stuart Hackett. Kilby was a romantic — like C. S. Lewis. Hackett was a rationalist — like C. S. Lewis. One taught literature, the other taught philosophy. One taught me to see with the eyes of a poet. The other taught me the ubiquitous relevance of the law of non-contradiction.

I thank God for both of them. I believe what they saw... Continue Reading

The Impoverishing Power of Financial Prosperity

Jon Bloom
The Impoverishing Power of Financial Prosperity

The story of the rich young man in Mark 10 has a chilling message: earthly prosperity can make people spiritually destitute.


“Teacher! Teacher, please wait!”

Jesus and his disciples were just leaving town. They turned and saw a young man hurrying toward them. His clothes, carriage, elocution all communicated “aristocrat.” But his face was distressed and there was urgency in his voice. The disciples assumed someone else needed healing or deliverance.

The man... Continue Reading

Desiring God for God

Tony Reinke
Desiring God for God

Green Mount Cemetery is a 174-year-old, 60-acre plot of land in downtown Baltimore. It stands like a fortress, separated from the city and her bustle by a thick stone wall perimeter. Through a narrow stone archway entrance and inside the wall, street noise fades and time seems to stop, and acres of rolling hills and stone ornaments rise into the sky.

The sea of memorials are scrubbed old by the years, adding to the sense of nostalgia and age. Here on the city soil, tall stone memorials... Continue Reading