How to Repent as a Christian

Michael Johnson
How to Repent as a Christian

Ina previous post, Tim Chester asserts that we can only change through ongoing daily faith and daily repentance. In other words, repentance is not exclusively for the non-Christian. Rather, together with ongoing faith, repentance should be normative for the Christian.

But this call to daily repentance is not a burden for God’s children! Rather, it is good news. It’s just not easy.

Jack Miller:

Be encouraged then, fellow believer. In calling you to daily repentance, the Lord Jesus... Continue Reading

Infant Baptism and a Puzzling Text

John Piper

From age 18 to 28, my schooling became increasingly less congenial to believers’ baptism.

My History

I grew up in a Southern Baptist home and church. Then Wheaton College broadened my world, and I learned the word “Evangelical.” I discovered that there were Presbyterians who were better Christians than I was. Then Fuller Seminary challenged me again as the debate grew more intense.

Then at the University of Munich, I was totally alone. All the German students were Lutheran,... Continue Reading

You Can Change! (Or Can You?)

Tim Chester
You Can Change! (Or Can You?)

I wanted my book on sanctification, You Can Change, to be an anti-self-help book written in the style of a self-help book! So each chapter is built around a question to ask of yourself and ends with questions to help readers work through an area of their lives they would like to change.

But the central message is that we cannot change ourselves through our own effort. Instead, we are changed by God through faith. The key is understand how the dynamic of change by faith takes place... Continue Reading

Is God Glad Osama Bin Laden's Dead?

John Piper
Is God Glad Osama Bin Laden's Dead?

God’s emotions are complex—like yours, only a million times more. Right now, your emotions about bin Laden are not simple, i.e. not single. There are several, and they intermingle. That is a good thing. You are God-like.

In response to Osama bin Laden’s death, quite a few tweets and blogs have cited the biblical truth that “God does not delight in the death of the wicked.” That is true.

It is also true that God does delight in the death of the wicked. There are things... Continue Reading

Loving Enemies of the Cross

Michael Johnson

Piper writes on what it means to love enemies of the cross of Christ:

My greatest longing in response to this enmity is that Christians walk in the way of the cross. Yes, militant Islam is big and threatening. It may even be the true Quranic Islam. There are alarmists whose whole tone seems to awaken political and even militant responses from Christians.
My concern is that as the church we distance ourselves from this kind of response and focus on the truth that we will never... Continue Reading

Three Cheers for Not Hiding God in Scholarship

John Piper

David Lyle Jeffrey and Gregory Maillet just published Christianity and Literature: Philosophical Foundations and Critical Practice (IVP, 2011). The series preface (by Francis Beckwith and J. P. Moreland) contains this heartening exhortation to Christian scholars to stop hiding their belief in God.

They quote atheist philosopher Quentin Smith who says that one reason the university academic community has become increasingly secular is because “theists tend to... Continue Reading

Ominous Ravines and Unapproachable Crags

John Piper
Ominous Ravines and Unapproachable Crags

This is a plea that we would open our eyes wide to the not-God for the sake of God.

By the “not-God” I have in mind the skies—day and night—the clouds, the mountains, and the oceans. And a thousand other things. But especially these natural glories.

Look at them. Think about the distances involved from here to the stars, and from the surface of the water to the bottom of the deepest ocean. Think about those heights and those terrible depths, and how much a mountain... Continue Reading

Four Kinds of Freedom

Josh Etter

John Piper from this week's sermon on John 8:30-36:

1) If you don't have the desire to do a thing, you are not fully free to do it. Oh, you may muster the will power to do what you don't want to do, but nobody calls that full freedom. It's not the way we want to live. There is a constraint and pressure on us that we don't want.

2) And if you have the desire to do something, but no ability to do it, you are not free to do it.

3) And if you have the desire and the ability to do something,... Continue Reading

God Has Two Hands

Josh Etter

John Calvin comments on 1 Peter 5:5:

We are to imagine that; God has two hands; the one, which like a hammer beats down and breaks in pieces those who raise up themselves; and the other, which raises up the humble who willingly let down themselves, and is like a firm prop to sustain them. Were we really convinced of this, and had it deeply fixed in our minds, who of us would dare by pride to urge war with God?

Taken from Calvin's Commentaries.