Jack’s Typewriter

Tony Reinke

Thankfully you never saw our big mistake in the C.S. Lewis conference trailer.

For the video we hired an actor to play Lewis, to walk through a garden, to look into the sky, and to read a book in a high-back chair.

But one scene nobody saw was Lewis at his typewriter, not because we didn’t accidentally film the scene (and delete it later), but because such a scene never…

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Fed Up with Life and Ready to Write

David Mathis

Ink is the great cure for all human ills.

So wrote a young C.S. Lewis to a childhood friend. Lewis was only seventeen years old when he penned such a claim, but he has proved wise beyond his years. Here’s the full statement from his letter of May 30, 1916:

Whenever you are fed up with life, start writing: ink is the great cure for all human ills.

Whether we…

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Lewis Live-Stream Free for All

David Mathis

UPDATE: See available audio and video rebroadcasts.

At long last, we gather this weekend in Minneapolis for the Desiring God 2013 National Conference.

The fullest experience will be on the ground in Minnie, but we’re kicking the doors wide open across the Worldwide Web for all to stream in. Whosoever wills may come with the free-of-cost conference live-stream.

All the action is available — in English, Spanish, and Russian…

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Hope for the Battle with Intractable Weakness

Jon Bloom

We all have sin-infected weaknesses that are intractable. They are deeply woven into the fabric of who we are and are frequently exacerbated by our sinful responses to them.

Inherent weaknesses are different from indwelling sin. Indwelling sin is evil that is waging war against God in our very members (Romans 7:21–23). Inherent weaknesses are our bodily experience of God’s curse of futility that is affecting all of creation (Romans…

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The Strange Glory of Ordinary Things

John Piper

Clyde Kilby was born September 26, 1902. He may have been my most influential teacher when I was in college. But then again it may have been Stuart Hackett. Kilby was a romantic — like C. S. Lewis. Hackett was a rationalist — like C. S. Lewis. One taught literature, the other taught philosophy. One taught me to see with the eyes of a poet. The other taught me the…

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Jesus Is Not Your Sin-Manager

Owen Strachan

What comes to mind when you think of the word “financial debt?” College loans? Low-budget TV commercials? Interminable stress and prolonged discouragement?

These are all possible, and understandable, responses. Here’s another one: Jesus Christ.

Jesus Came to Crush Our Debt

What do I mean by this rather odd statement? To begin with, on the cross Jesus paid for all of our sin. We were terribly, tremendously in the wrong before…

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Recovering the Lost Art of Chivalry

Joe Rigney

They say that chivalry is dead, that the medieval ideal of the humble knight is laid low in the dust. They were saying the same in C.S. Lewis’s day. And Lewis, rather than lamenting the loss of chivalry, sought to do something about it.

Lewis loved chivalry, at one point even referring to it as “the one hope of the world.” Lewis deeply appreciated the double demand that the chivalric…

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Free Saeed: A Wife’s Plea to Iran’s President

Nahgmeh Abedini

Thursday marks one year since Iran imprisoned my husband, Pastor Saeed Abedini, for his Christian faith. When the Iranian Revolutionary Guard arrested Saeed without warning and took him to the notorious Evin Prison, I could not have imagined the journey God had planned for us — a journey still without a finish line in sight.

The Empty Seat in Our Home

All I can remember about those first days are…

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Don’t Do God’s Will Like an Atheist

John Piper

After my message to the Liberty University student body last week, a perceptive student asked this clarifying question: So you don’t believe that altruistic acts are possible or desirable?

I asked for his definition of altruism so that I could answer what he was really asking. He said, “Doing a good deed for others with no view to any reward.” I answered: that’s right, whether or not it’s possible, I…

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My Dragon Skin Torn Off

Luma Simms

I first read C.S. Lewis just after I arrived in the United States as a nine-year-old girl. Born in Iraq, I was still learning English when I first read The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, and it captured my attention and my imagination.

Life moved on, I settled into this country, I became an adult, and I later read other non-fiction and philosophical books by Lewis. But what…

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