For My Name’s Sake

Isaiah 48:9–11


Principle for Bible Reading

We should be constantly comparing lists of characteristics about God to determine if qualities are the same, different, or overlapping. This is especially important when statements seem contrary to each other. In this lab, John Piper models this and uncovers God's love for us and his commitment to his own glory.

View the outline.


Outline

Introduction/Prayer (00:00–00:35)

Observations (00:35–06:24)

  1. God refers to his radical commitment to his own praise six times in three verses.
  2. The progression of God’s passion for his glory: being ⇒ name ⇒ glory ⇒ praise.
  3. God also expresses his patience with and love for us six times.
  4. The foundation of his love for us is his commitment to himself.

Conclusions (06:24–10:35)

  1. Love for people is not the most foundational thing in God’s being. Underneath his love for us is his commitment to himself.
  2. God is angry. Why is he angry? They still need to be refined, because they continue to profane his name. The restraining of his anger is not the resolution of God’s anger. Isaiah 53:4–5 and Romans 3:25 are the resolution of God’s anger.


Study Questions

  1. What does it mean for God to say that he acts, “for my name’s sake,” or, “for the sake of my praise,” or, “for my own sake”?
  2. Based on these verses, how does his commitment to his own glory relate to his love for his people?
  3. God lovingly defers his anger in verse 9, but the restraining of his anger is not the resolution of his anger. Can you think of other verses in Isaiah that tell us how the problem of God’s righteous anger is resolved for the believer?
Piper: “The foundation of God’s love for us is his commitment to his own glory.”