When the Abortion Industry Self-Destructs

When the Abortion Industry Self-Destructs

In one sense, there are really just two types of people when it comes to the topic of abortion: those who think it is okay to kill unborn babies, and those who think it is wrong. If you don’t think you’re in one of these categories, you still are; you’re just confused.

Confusion, though, isn’t the most terrible thing. It means there is still hope, and in fact, this hopeful condition likely characterizes the general public of the United States. Most people don’t have a deep conviction about unborn babies. Most people don’t even think about unborn babies unless it’s an election year or the news runs a story. Even most who support abortion could only repeat the rhetoric they’ve heard from devotees.

And therefore, if confusion is what’s really popular, the question becomes: What will it take for abortion activists to convince the general public that their position is a psychotic threat to humanity?

Toward the Tipping Point

When will the rhetoric about women’s health and women’s rights be exposed for what it truly is (since, of course, by women’s “health” and women’s “rights” they must not mean the near 28 million girls aborted since 1973)? What will it take? Where is the tipping point when the truth of their enterprise can no longer be ignored by the popular conscience?

Signs suggest that mind-changing momentum is beginning to build, and to our surprise, it’s not so much from the direct work of pro-life advocates, but from the unmasked mishaps of abortion activists.

What if, counter-conventional as it might seem, the greatest felt gains for unborn humans will come by the abortion industry’s self-destruction?

Sick Quotas and Quotations

Take, for instance, a recent report about an abortion clinic in Aurora, Colorado. The Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains reportedly awarded the clinic for exceeding their abortion quota. That is to say, in addition to other reports of such quotas, there was a certain number of abortions that the clinic was prescribed to perform and when they surpassed that number they were honored, all of which backfires against the language of abortions as safe, legal, and rare. This isn’t new information, but it’s getting out there. The $1.21 billion reported revenue from Planned Parenthood in 2013 is the poisoned fruit of these money-making death chambers. These clinics are trying to reach a number in your neighborhood. They want to kill unborn babies on your street and across the block and down the road. And when they kill them, they get awards.

We’re not supposed to know about the awards, but we do. President Obama doesn’t applaud Planned Parenthood for these quotas in his speeches, but he gave them a reported $540.6 million last year in taxpayer funding to keep up “the good work.” Sooner or later, the conviction-less masses are going to start scratching their heads. Something isn’t adding up.

Consider another instance just last week. After the Hobby Lobby decision was released, a board member from NARAL Pro-Choice America, in an un-manicured response, suggested that women across the country should have sex inside Hobby Lobby stores as a protest. So maybe NARAL just advocates for women’s rights, but not women’s respect. It’s not clear. No, actually, it’s embarrassing. And to be sure, more candor like that is bound to push the confused into clarity. Please, just keep talking.

The Coming Cumulative Effect

Light bulbs are coming on. And that will continue to happen. The question is about when we will feel the cumulative effect. How long will it take for the abortion industry to self-destruct? How many instances like this must happen? How many leaked truths and unmasked mishaps must occur before the confused populace is jostled into seeing the real agenda of abortion?

Because after all, when it comes to this topic, there are really just two types of people.


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Jonathan Parnell (@jonathanparnell) is a writer and content strategist at Desiring God. He lives in the Twin Cities with his wife, Melissa, and their four children, and is the co-author of How to Stay Christian in Seminary.